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    • #18498

      dax
      Participant

      I went to camping last week and foolishly didn’t take waterproof shoes. I spent three days with more or less sodden feet and ever since then have had an annoyingly persistent case of athlete’s foot on one little toe. I’ve done all the suggested stuff, clean it carefully, dry it carefully, use the powder, changes socks at the drop of a hat into a fresh pair but the f*cker refuses to go away. It’ll die down to the point where I think it’s gone and then flare up again. I know I can’t be the only one here to have had this problem so hit me with your remedies shoewawa, how can I shift this before I resort to amputation?

    • #18499

      kate
      Participant

      Have you considered that it might not be Athlete’s foot?

      • #18500

        dax
        Participant

        Well the Dr has looked at it and didn’t suggest anything else, and it does respond to the appropriate treatment just getting it to sod off for good seems to be impossible. Any ideas about what else it might be?

      • #18520

        kate
        Participant

        Doctors tend to work on a process of elimination so I’d perhaps go back and check if his/her original diagnosis still stands. My thinking is that it might be a different type of infection albeit still fungal.

    • #18513

      david
      Participant

      Regular bathing of feet in vinegar. Add a little salt and warm water if you want, for that wonderful fish and chip smell. Bathe for 15 minutes or so and then dry feet, do not rinse off.

      The idea is to change the climate adversely with respect to fungal infections not just on the surface but allowing it to get into the skin when your feet are immersed for some time. It’s worth applying pressure to toenails to try and suck some under the nails a bit too.

      Vinegar is very very cheap – do it daily until signs of improvement and then a bit less frequently for a period afterwards. This has cleared up cases for me that did not respond to expensive powder and creams.

      This advice came from a doctor. It works for me. And I believe the Romans! Been using this method for some years when needed. You can also use it as a preventative as it does not favour the organisms that cause it.

      • #18515

        peter
        Participant

        Regular bathing of feet in vinegar.

        Nah, its your own urine that you need to soak your feet in to get rid of athletes foot.

      • #18516

        andy
        Participant

        The problem with that is that the Athletes Foot adapts to your own urine and mutates to become immune to it. By far better to use other peoples and/or other animals, etc. I am joking ofcourse!

      • #18524

        emme
        Participant

        The vinegar approach sounds like a really good one, in creating an environment it can’t tolerate.

    • #18501

      Sam
      Participant

      The only cure I ever found was when I waded through a stagnant pool to get access to a caravan site in South Wales. Not sure what was in the water, but my feet had lovely skin for months after.
      Not exactly a cure as it only temporarily removes the flaky bits, but the dog loves licking between my toes when they’re particularly encrusted and to be honest, it does feel quite nice in a pain/pleasure sort of way – especially when she has a quick nibble…
      Hope that is of help to you.

      • #18502

        dax
        Participant

        Heh, only if you can lend me your dog?

      • #18503

        Sam
        Participant

        The first ever Athletes Foot Assistance Dog! 😀

      • #18510

        emme
        Participant

        Buy a tube of Canestan but get the thrush variety as it has 2% clotrimazole rather than 1% in the athlete’s foot variety.

        If you’re really badly infected, change socks every day, wash them hot, spray the insides of all your shoes with an athlete’s foot spray to kill the fungus and wash and dry your feet every day and apply the cream twice daily.

        Dog saliva can infect your skin with ringworm. Then you’ll need to use a cream AND an oral drug.

      • #18511

        kate
        Participant

        If you’re really badly infected, change socks every day

        Serious question. Do people not do this routinely?

      • #18508

        Brinny
        Participant

        My dog has athletes tongue, can anyone tell me how to help him?

        More seriously, I have hot feet so wearing safety boots all day leaves my feet in a constant state of mushroom cultivation. A daily wash with anti-dandruff shampoo works wonders, better than the creams and powders, once my feet are thoroughly dry I moisturise the area with E45 cream to stop cracking and itching. I do this daily in summer, maybe twice a week in winter.

    • #18504

      debby
      Participant

      Make sure you hot wash your socks and bedding and towels and bathmat at 60 or above, and give your shoes a good clean and disinfect. Otherwise you treat your foot and then get it back again.

      • This reply was modified 1 year, 4 months ago by debby.
    • #18506

      catembi
      Participant

      Use Athlete’s foot ointment (Mycil or Boots). More effective than the powder. If it doesn’t respond, it might be some infection other than Athlete’s Foot.

    • #18507

      Brinny
      Participant

      Don’t know why, but a paddle in sea water worked for me when nothing else helped.

    • #18509

      jasper123
      Participant

      Fungal infections are very persistent. The key is to continue treating for at least a month after you think it has gone (it hasn’t!)

    • #18512

      Feival
      Participant

      I get really bad athlete’s foot from my running shoes. Get yourself to the chemist and ask them for the strongest stuff you can have. Don’t bother with the standard supermarket brands such as Scholl which is useless!

    • #18517

      Gemma
      Participant

      Carefully grind dead skin off with a pumice. Dead skin stops so much of the stuff (be it anti-fungal compounds, vinegar, brine or cobra piss) teaching the live, infected skin underneath it.

      • #18523

        dax
        Participant

        Good one, had a scrub with pumice stone tonight and the hot itchy feeling has gone, along with an amount of skin. Thanks.

    • #18518

      peter
      Participant

      Wrap your infected toe (or even your whole foot if you wish to be thorough) in a heavy duty duct tape then remove the infected skin by simply peeling it all off. If that fails then you may wish to try an extra coarse grade sandpaper or even an industrial blow torch in extreme cases of infection… 😉

      Hope this helps!

    • #18519

      Sam
      Participant

      Boiling water.

      Failing that dogshit and salt. (do not take orally).

    • #18521

      kate
      Participant

      Are you still using the same shoes? If so then bin them.

      • #18522

        dax
        Participant

        Yeah, binned the original shoes, now have two identical pairs of everyday shoes (walking shoes Karrimor type things) so they don’t get worn on consecutive days. In an interesting side note as I knew I was going to do this I bought cheapo shoes (own brand rather than Merrill) at half the price and have noticed 0 difference in performance! Well interesting to me anyway.

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